Skip to main content

About your Search

20130828
20130828
SHOW
News 15
Cavuto 2
( more )
STATION
ALJAZAM 27
MSNBCW 23
CNNW 18
KGO (ABC) 12
FBC 11
KPIX (CBS) 10
CNBC 8
KTVU (FOX) 8
SFGTV2 8
KNTV (NBC) 7
CSPAN 6
KQED (PBS) 6
CSPAN2 5
SFGTV 5
KRCB (PBS) 4
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 190
French 1
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 196 (some duplicates have been removed)
at film from august of 1963 as demonstration and marchers gathered on the mall here in washington d.c. this was the headline from the washington post, a mammoth rally of 200,000 jamming the mall in a solemn orderly plea for equality. that's our line for those of you over the age of 50. for those of you under the age of 50. 585-3880. 202 is the area code here in washington d.c. we'll get your call on march. >> your calls and comments in a moment. lots get to the other stories this morning that is latest development from syria and headlines from overseas. the guardian newspaper the attack on syria just days away as the house of commons recalled for a vote and the picture of the british prime minster as he departs yesterday as the parliament resuming session tomorrow breaking from their august recess. from the marine herald, -- miami herald, a stage is set. u.s. and allies act as syria's intelligence mount. as u.s. officials said privately that a flood of previously undisclosed intelligence including satellite images and intercepted communication erased last minute administration doubt
centered on peace commemorating the 50t 50th anniversary of martin luther king's march on washington. is there any way we could be firing rockets at syria before he delivers that speech? >> i seriously doubt that number one for the optics, number two, the u.n. in texters are on the ground. we expect the administration to release a case publicly that gets away from the circumstance case that you and i are talking about and present a more factual case, specific examples of how the assad regime went forward with this. that's what we're expecting. i don't expect this to happen today while the president is speaking, although it is a much anticipated speech, the 50t 50th affords of the "i have a dream" speech that culminated with the march on washington 50 years ago. >> thank you so much, live from washington. >> the iranian stream leader says intervention in syria by the u.s. would be a "disaster." david jackson is on the ground in lebanon. thank you for joining us. what's the reaction in the middle east to the supreme leader's statement this morning? >> morgan, across the board, it's all
warner has the latest on options for action in syria. then we return to the march on washington 50 years on. tonight reflections from the last living speaker, georgia congressman john liu business. >> it was all inclusive it was black and white, latino, asia asian-american and native american. >> they came from idaho, wyoming, and they were there. carrying their signs. >> and we conclude our series on governing in a time of gridlock with a look at how the entertainment world sees the nation's capital. >> the question we ask is if someone is actually getting something done, do the ends justify the means? it is an interesting question to ask when washington is paralyzed by gridlock. >> that is all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by... moving our economy for 160 years, bnsf the engine that connects us. >> and the hewlett foundation working to solve social and environmental problems at home and around the world. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and this program was made possible by the corporation for pub
after dr. king delivered his i have a dream speech, washington and the world will reflect on the work still to be done. meantime, the u.s. and the world allies let syria know that chemical attacks will not be tolerated. we'll get the latest on what kind of military strike could punish assad without somehow swaying the country's civil war. those realities weigh heavily on president obama today when he marks the dream anniversary, honoring the legacy of nonviolence on the eve of an expected u.s.-led military strike. good morning from washington. it's wednesday, august 28th, 2013. this "the daily rundown," i'm chuck todd. let's get right to the first reads of the morning. today is the 50th anniversary of the march on washington. of course dr. martin luther king jr.'s i have a dream speech before a crowd of a quarter million people in washington and millions more on television watched on that 1963 day. his remarks galvanized the civil rights movement. president obama called it one of the five greatest speeches in american history. >> when we let it ring from every village and every hamlet
anniversary of the march on washington. inside story is next. >>> 50 years after the march on washington there are lingering challenges to the modern social justice movement and a modern debathe as to how to accomplish dr. king's dream. this is inside story. hello everybody i'm david shuster, it was called a march for jobs and freedom. hundreds of thousands of peaceful protestors gathered on the national mall and ignited a new conversation about civil rights in america. highlighted by the march and by dr. martin luther king jr.'s i have a dream speech are still alive today. still ahead, we'll examine inquality and social justice. finally, we'll take you to an organizer who was there. joyce ladner. >> i had a stage pass. no one on that stage had ever seen that many people before. that's the major one memory. i have a lot of others as well. >> was it an energetic crowd? was it a me mesmerized crowd? >> it was a very friendly crowd. it was almost like meeting new friends. it was easy going. it was an easy crowd. >> was there a sense that eventually society would progress and things would ch
the 50th anniversary of the march on washington. i am proud to stand before you as the first african-american, first woman city administrator. >> [applause] >>thank you. i i am grateful to be inspired and mentored by many great civil rights leaders and my educational leaders which includes usf law school. >> [applause] >> and my family members who have mentored me and have paved the way for me along my career path. i could not have gotten there without them. my greatest inspirations are my parents william little and maria little, and i my greatest inspirations are my parents william little and maria little, and i want to talk about howthey were inspired by the march on washington and dr. king's speech which subsequently has passed on to me. my mother was among the 200,000 people who joined dr. martin they were inspired by the march on washington and dr. king's speech which subsequently has passed on to me. my mother was among the 200,000 people who joined dr. martin luther king on the march on washington 50 years ago and stood up for the rights for freedom.as a teenager growing up
are coming, indeed. ron mott, thank you. "the washington post," as was recognized by the post itself this past weekend barely mentioned the reverend king speech because he was the last speaker. they had gone to to press and it was not really notable to a lot of reporters who were covering it here in washington, d.c. you've been following this from our bureau in washington. all of these reflections of history come together. identify talked to jesse jackson today and he said this is the moment where president obama needs to do what lbj did and set out a legislative mandate for the dream and that voting rights is a constitutional amendment. that's the focus. that and on economic injustice and equality. >> i think it also puts a spotlight on the relationship between presidents like kennedy or president obama and a leader like martin luther king. let's go back to reality. in the sprachk 1963 president kennedy did not want this march to happen. he thought it would get out of control. he thought it might have speakers like john lewis who would go in directions more radical. he kept his deta
washington. helping to kick off our special coverage, chris matthews, host of msnbc "hardball" is live in washington, d.c. at the lincoln memorial and where all of today's event will take place. chris, good morning. let's set the scene for everybody. as we understand the program for today, we have three presidents, a host and current and former future civil rights and leaders and politicians taking the stage. truly a diverse program but we all look back 50 years ago to those vivid images that still inspire today. >> thomas, this is going to be a hot day. it's not that hot. it's sweltering today but not as bad as it could get in washington. it's drizzling and may clear up. i expect there is heated rhetoric today. this country is divideded right now, heavily and sharply divided between the one reject an african-american president and rejected him from the day he was elected and the day they heard he might be elected. the other half of the country almost pouting with this illusion right now. gee whiz. why isn't this greater? pef an african-american president and things not happen
"politicsnation" starts right now with reverend al sharpton live from washington, d.c. rev, that had to be one heck of a day in american history to be a part of that. >> no, i was very honored to be part of it. it was an exciting day, a great day. we're going to talk about it on "politicsnation," ed. and you did a great job saturday at the march. we really enjoyed you. you have a little preacher in you. >> i do. i haven't unleashed it all yet, rev. >> all right. all right. >> "politicsnation" starts right now here on msnbc. rev, take it away. >> all right. thank you, ed. thanks to you for tuning in. tonight's lead, the dream lives on 50 years after dr. martin luther king jr. inspired the nation. america's first african-american president reminded us -- reminded all of us that today's economic inequities mean there's still much more work to do. i was there for the day's commemoration as some 100,000 people gathered to hear more than 200 speakers. everyone from former presidents, carter and clinton, to activists and civil rights leaders. at points there was a spontaneous song
at the 1963 march on washington for jobs on freedom. "he has got the whole world in his hands. >> let us listen please to the words of this song and understand that in the heart of our creator, every soul has the same value and should be valued equally. thank you very much for the opportunity to sing for you. ♪ he's got the whole world in his hands. he's got the whole wide world in his hands. he's got the whole world in his hands. he's got the whole world in his hands. [singing "he's got the whole ♪orld in his hands"] ♪ [applause] >> ladies and gentlemen, the speaker of the united states house of representatives, the honorable john boehner. >> how about a round of applause? [applause] let me thank my colleagues for their testimonials and express my gratitude to all the members of staff of the congressional black caucus in their assistance planning this ceremony. we have many guests. the mayor is here. our attorney general is here. we want to welcome all of you. right now, i have the distinct honor of introducing a great patriot, the recipient of the presidential medal of freedom, a
think about the march on washington they only think about the dream speech and that part of the speech. they don't think about anything else and you are right. he said a lot harsher things than anyone talked about. this is including the absence of women on the stage on purpose. they even missed the dream part of the speech. they were looking so much for the violence that they did not see it. i'm wondering how they thought, with anyen there, notice that they've missed the story. >> i want to address media coverage on the march on washington and i remember the three major networks were there. withoutered it interruption and they broadcasted it to europe. "the washington post" assign more than 60 reporters to cover that story. it was really big news. a congressman, you said that the civil rights movement without the media would be like a bird without wings. what did you mean? >> i meant that. >> i know you did, but tell us what you meant. without the media, especially in the american south, without reporters, without the photographer, without the cameras to bring the message .nto the livi
anniversary of the march on washington. wasn't it exciting to see the enthusiasm and the film of the people of the day? who could have expected so many of us would be here who had ties to all that was owing on? who could suspect that we would all be with john lewis? [applause] attorney general, mr. mayor, you honor us with your presence. .he fierce urgency of now words rang out across the national mall, the call echoed in households across america. the summons ignited a movement to make real the promise of democracy. of course everyone knows the "i had a dream" speech, but the fierce urgency of now part of it was not only an inspiration, it was a motivation to act. was not the first time dr. martin luther king jr. urged fellow travelers to reject the status quo, to in his words at the march, refuse to take the tranquilizing drug of gradualism. seven years early now to trim of in francisco, my hometown, 1956, dr. king delivered the same message to the delegates of the naacp convention. --said "now i realize those all over are telling us we must slow up, he said, but we cannot afford this slo
. >>> and 50 years after that historic march on washington, looking back at the dream and the dreamer. ♪ >>> diplomats are gathering in new york to discuss potential military intervention in syria. and un inspectors are continuing their investigation in a suburb of damascus. the chemical weapons attack happened one week ago today. david cameron has now called for meeting of the un security counsel permanent members. the security counsel has been debating action since it began more than two years ago, but so far no decisive action has been taken because of division among members of the counsel. the council consists of 15 members, of those five are permanent. they are the only nations with the power to veto the council's resolutions. joining us now for the late zest john terret. >> dell, i think you have to remember that the british have a parliamentary system. the executive sits in the chamber. it's a bit like having the white house in the house of representatives. so therefore there is a lot more pressure on the executives over there to make sure they do things legally. and i think
the march on washington, looking back and remembering both the dream and the dreamer. >> and the army doctor turned killer, a jury decides whether he lives or if he dies. >> the syrian government now calling on the u.n. to investigate chemical weapons on syrian army soldiers. syrian ambassadors gathering in new york to discuss potential military intervention there. meanwhile u.n. chemical inspectors continue their investigation into the august 21st attack i in a suburb of damascus. prime minister david cameron calling for meetings. >>> joining us now for the latest diplomat i can updates. do we now know what was on the draft resolution on the part of the british government? >> we don't. no one is leaking over this. normally there are a few leaks, but on this occasion we really don't know what is in this document. to be clear there was a meeting in the side room involving the five permanent security council. the united kingdom, the united states, france, russia, and china. there was also a meeting taking place, and i it's still going on at the u.n. involving haiti. after either of those meeti
years ago today, martin luther king junior delivered his legendary dream speech in washington. it was a battle cry for liberty and justice for all. it changed the course of our history. king would have been 84 years old had he lived to this day. he would have been able to witness the nation's first african-american president standing on those same steps he did in 1963. here is president obama commemorating dr. king's dream and his lasting legacy this afternoon. >> on a hot summer day they assembled here in our nation's capital under the shadow of the great emancipator. everyone that realizes what those glorious patriots knew on that day that change does not come from washington but to washington. that change has always been built on our willingness, we, the people, to take on the mantle of citizenship, you are marching. that's the lesson of our past. that's the promise of tomorrow. >> okay, bob, you were particularly moved by this speech as you were by dr. king's speech so many years, 50 years ago. >> yeah. i think if dr. king had been alive today, listened to these tributes,
of the march on washington. we'll take you there live. >>> and 184,000 acres burned. plus, 4,000 firefighters equals one of the worst wildfires in california state history. we're going to have a live report. this is "cnn newsroom." u.s. officials are all but telling u.n. inspectors to get out of syria, get out of the way. it is not and if, but when the u.s. will launch an attack. the u.n. teams are carrying on. inspectors back to evidence for the alleged chemical attack. these pictures were posted online showing inspectors talking to survivors at a medical facility near damascus. u.s. warships, they are ready, but there are warnings here at home and around the world that the united states could create inextricable mess by conducting a military strike on syria. cnn is the only u.s. network broadcasting live from inside of the country, inside syria. fred pleitgen is on the ground in damascus with the very latest. fred, essentially what is it like to be there with people thinking and believing that a strike is imminent? >> well, i have to tell you, people really do seem to be nervous here. there
a better time for this march on washington. heather headley has finished singing. here comes the president. [ cheers and applause ] >> to the king family, who have sacrificed and inspired so much, to president clinton, president carter, vice president biden, jill, fellow americans. five decades ago today americans came to this honored place to lay claim to a promise made at our founding. we hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their creator with certain unalienable rights. that among these are life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. in 1963, almost 200 years after those words were set to paper, a full century after a great war was fought and emancipation proclaimed, that promise, those truths remained unmet. and so they came by the thousands from every corner of our country, men and women, young and old, blacks who longed for freedom and whites who could no longer accept freedom for themselves while witnessing the subjugation of others. across the land congregations sent them off with food and with prayer. in the middle of the
washington, there is a march -- a reenactment about a mile east of here at the base of the capitol, that's where they will begin retracing the steps that were taken 50 years ago. we have heard from senator angus kaine, joaquin castro from san antonio, texas, and a highlight so far as been the music. two-thirds of the trio peter paul and mary sang blowing in the wind. and un ambassador, major of atlanta, he got up there and belted out some spiritual songs that were popular in the heyday of the civil rights moment. at this moment we're hearing from the widow of med -- med ger evers. and earlier we heard from melanie campbell. she had some very strong words about a topic that is on the forefront of many people's minds here today. let's listen. >> today racism and inequality does not manifest itself in a white sheet, jim crow laws, poll taxes or barking dogs, but the dogs are still biting in other ways. today there are no white sheets, but there are judges in black robes in the u.s. supreme court who struck down section 4 of the voting rights act, opening the flood gates in many states to p
goose bumps. and you can't help but become emotional. the mall in washington today is packed with people from all over the country. thousands of people who made this journey on the 50th anniversary of the march on washington. the national mall is filled. you can see the reflecting pool and the monument in the background. then over my shoulder, the lincoln memorial where we have been hearing performances all day which will culminate with the president of the united states. the first african-american president giving his speech on the anniversary. i am don lemon, everyone. we're going to hear from three presidents this afternoon. former president jimmy carter will speak. as well as former president bill clinton will speak here as well. then, of course, president barack obama. plus, civil rights icon, congress n congressman john lewis, the only surviving speaker from the 1963 march on washington will deliver his remarks. first we'll hear from superstar oprah winfrey. oprah is scheduled to speak any minute now. we wait for oprah winfrey and others to take to the podium, and they will begin t
anniversary of a water shed moment in our nation's history, here is a picture now from washington, dc, and you can see oprah is speaking at this very moment and it is raining because you can see the umbrellas. president obama and civil rights activists can demands are gathering at the lincoln memorial mark, the 1963 march on washington led by dr. martin luther king jr. early today, leap rhymes sang "amazing grace." ♪ amazing grace ♪ how sweet the sound jamie foxx and al sharpton also spoke this morning. >> abc7 news is joined by our reporter in washington, dc. >> good morning, that is oprah winfrey talking behind me and it is a tall order to try to speak as she is speaking but right now you can see that the people have all their eyes on oprah. it seems like this maybe was a little bit slow to get going but it is very humid here and this has been a lot of rain and people have to go through security checkpoints in order to come out here but, now, this is a crowd that is excited and eagerly awaiting remarks from president obama. it is impossible to miss the symbolism of the nation's first bla
here before. >> yeah. >> in washington, why not give the weapons inspectors the amount of time that they need? >> well, you're right. the white house and administration officials have essentially made the point moot as far as the any of the inspectors. it's interesting, because one week ago today, it was one week ago today, that is when that attack occurred outside damascus. initially after that, the president was still hesitant to engage in any military action against syria. this has been going on for two and a half years, the length of that civil war. he talked the need for a mandate and operating under the structures of international law. everyone is waiting for the intelligence report. we understand that there are meetings ongoing among the president and top advisers. the intel report is going to have to be declassified for release to the american people. there are indications that tomorrow could be the day we see that. mean time, we have gone from the president on thursday saying a u.n. mandate was necessary to yesterday, the vice president saying there is no doubt that th
to mark the 50th anniversary of the march on washington. and martin luther king jr.'s march on washington. and martin luther king jr.'s historic speech on civil rights. captioning funded by cbs good morning. good to be with you. the obama administration is gearing up for military action against syria, possibly within days. as early as today the u.s. could release an intelligence report directly linking the assad regime to chemical weapons attack against syrian civilians. defense secretary chuck hagel says u.s. forces are ready, and the white house says the goal of the military strike is not regime change. alfonso is live with more. good morning, alfonso. >> in fact, united nations inspectors are back on the search for evidence of a poisonous gas attack outside the syrian capital this morning. at the same time there are four u.s. navy destroyers in position m mediterranean, and they're within range of syrian targets. >> reporter: rebels that may get a boost from western air strikes any day now. washington is rallying international support for action against the assad regime for its alleged
days five decades ago in front of majestic lincoln memorial in washington dc. the march on washington was an assemblage of people in power converging on washington dc, our nations capital, only occasionally seen every few decades. a quarter of 1 million americans march on washington that hot summer day. each representing thousands and thousands of americans were standing up for both racial equality and job opportunities. across the nation. now i will defer to our main speaker, the man who is there and whose words you will soon hear them up but this was the largest public gathering in washington dc until that time in our nations history. only surpassed by some of the antiwar marches that followed later in the 60s. african-americans, teachers, students, union workers, 30 of all creeds and people of many walks of life, came together to appeal to the conscience of the nation and demand action that would enable the patient to live up to our constitutional ideals. that would free african-americans from the shackles of poverty and discrimination and free all of us from the reality of segrega
jefferson, lincoln, washington had fought for. the only, i think, two pieces of oratory that would rival it would be fdr's, the only thing we have to fear is fear itself and president kennedy inaugural address. martin luther king joined the founding fathers 50 years ago today. >> reverend al sharpton obviously an important event 50 years ago. 50 years laterer there will be an african-american president going to commemorate this moment. what an extraordinary journey it has been and the journey, as you say every day and as all americans understand, the journey continues. what do you want to hear from the president of the united states today? >> well, i think that what we want to hear is a commitment to continue that journey but to also salute the fact that we have made the journey. we met with him two days ago after having a huge march on saturday about the issues now. and one of the things that i said is that i feel that he should not be compared to dr. king. he is the president. we want to hear from him as the generation before us heard from kennedy about what we are going to do. so i th
the argument that the world needs to do something but only to a opinion. patty culhane. al jazeera washington. >> mike, the administration direction has changed drastically, what happened? >> that is a testament to not only the power of the images, the horrific images but the testament to the power and ability to distribute those images. remember this happened last wednesday. thursday the president gave an uf statement that says we need to act within the auspices of international law. then the need for international inspectors, then the images continued to pour in. the international investigators set, assad needs to let the investigators in. the administration says there is little doubt that assad was responsible then yesterday we heard that extremely strong statements from secretary kerry in part to galvanize public opinion where he called it a moral obscenity and culminated by today where joe biden said there's no doubt the assad regime is responsible. >> mike, the american people are wary of any military involvement in syria. how does the president sell this military action? >> what's impo
on washington. this is our coverage of the dream 50 years later. events under way, we want to take you live now to the stage in front of the lincoln memorial. that is the same spot that dr. dr. jr. made that famous "i have a dream" speech 50 years ago. you can see umbrellas are out. the crowds number in the tens of thousands if not more gathering to make history today. some 50 years later. the choirs are singing. our mike viqueira is there, oprah winfrey will be starting the ceremonies in just a second. this is the lineup speaking today will be dr. king's family. presidents barack obama, bill clinton and jimmy carter as well as silver rights leader congressman john lewis. there will an number of bands and choirs performing in front of the crowd. joining us now from the lincoln memorial our mike viqueira. we have our dr. aubrey hendri hendrix{^l" ^}, and dr. williams of history and codirector of black studies. dr. hendrix, i want to start with you because you had a front-row seat to history last night. you were dining with a few important people. who might that have been. >> well, it was a large
primed. an attack on syria seems more imminent. a report from washington with the latest. >>> and markets are taking notice of what's happening in syria. how uncertainty is starting to affect your money. >>> the man who electrified a nation with a speech 50 years ago today. >>> finish line drama. more proof that the race is never over until it's over. >>> and good wednesday morning. the crisis in syria, heating up. triggering what's increasingly appearing to be an imminent u.s. response. >> as the u.s. considers its military options, with each passing day, it looks more and more like a u.s. strike against the syrian government. it's just a matter of time. abc's devin dwyer has the latest from washington. good morning, devin. >> reporter: that's right. president obama's national security team met at the white house last night to discuss syria. the president has decided to take action. the only question, now, is how. this morning, the white house has absolute certainty that syria's bashar al assad poisoned his own people. >> there's no doubt who is responsible for this heinous use of chemic
after the march on washington, let us remember that dr. king's last march was never finished. the poor people's campaign was never finished. some 50 years after the march on washington, while if you were -- you are people as a percentage in our country are poor, more as a number in our country are poor. while the ladder of opportunity extends to the heavens for our people today, more are tethered at the bottom and falling off everyday. say that thean distance between a child's aspirations represented by the top of that letter and a family situation at the bottom of that is the exactder measurement of that aaron's level of frustration. as we go home today, let us remember that the dreamer was also a doer. as we turn on our tvs tomorrow and see people walking out of places where they are being forced to survive on $7.25 by the thousands, let us commit to join them in fighting to lift up the bottom. at the top of that letter has extended, the tethers at the bottom must be unleashed. let us not just be dreamers. let us recommit to be doers. thank you, and god bless. [applause] >> from dest
, and his new documentary comes out september 27th. and "the washington post," ezra klein. robert reisch, we're at that time on the calendar again where september 30th we come to the point where we have to come up with a type of legislation to continue funding the government, followed quickly by an increase in the debt ceiling. and of course, as usual, the republican threats are flying. >> well, yes, lawrence, this whale of a fight. it is interesting to conceive of john boehner having a whale of a fight with a president that is not going to negotiate. it is like shadow boxing. and who are you actually going to fight with when the president is not going to negotiate? and the president is actually right in not negotiating. bond markets are already going to be roiled by the feds tapering off the quantitative easing, if you want a chance on that on the federal debt, we'll see the bond markets go crazy, wall street will go crazy, all the republican patriots will come down hard on them as they did the last time. >> i want to play what jay carney said about negotiating on the debt ceiling yesterday
cannot even get traction in washington talking about poverty. president barack obama and the members of congress, both the left and the right -- everybody has to it knowledge that they spend so much more time in washington talking about the middle class, they are obsessed, but we cannot get a conversation about poverty. why is that? >> you said it. it is a political sort of poll tested way to try to get that extra are centage point in terms of public opinion. that priorgs political leaders did, and certainly our civil rights leaders did, was they went against public opinion. they really said this is the morally right inc. to do, and we need to move the country in that direction. unfortunately, that type of leadership we don't see today. this president campaigned on raising the minimum wage. at one point, he was for raising it to even a higher level than he has suggested of late that he wants to raise it to. why is he negotiating against himself? why can't politicians understand that americans are hurting, that we need a living wage, not a minimum wage? >> that is really an important
-san rafael. >>> happening right now crowds are beginning to gather in washington, d.c. for the commemoration for the march on washington. this is a live picture of the memorial on the national mall. back on august 28th, 1963, 250,000 people took part in the march on washington for jobs and freedom. at noon today president obama will speak from the same spot. >> that is pretty special. it's nice to be here. it's nice to have my kids here. >> bill clinton and jimmy carter among the speakers today. along with oprah winfrey and jamie foxx. >>> a nonprofit group called d.c. 2024 is hosting a campaign to host the summer games in the washington-baltimore area. supporters predict the cost will be much lower because the area already has prime facilities. >> we won't have to build many new facilities for our olympics. the idea is we are already a leg up. >> other american cities mentioned as possibly bidding for the games include san francisco, los angeles, san diego, philadelphia, and boston. >>> coming up a controversial ban targeting soda, sugary drinks, and even whole milk. the bay area city that
you'll heard a lot about martin luther king's march on washington, but did you know the full name of the historic event 50 years ago was the march on washington for jobs and freedom. are we better off today than we were back then? some shocking stats for you upon my return. >> thousands of people gathered in washington to celebrate the 50th anniversary of martin luther king's i have a "dream" speech and the march on washington you may not know that the title of the event was the march on washington for jobs and freedom. the fact is dr. king was as focused on economic equality as he was on civil rights. in the last year of his life he launched what is called "the poor people's's "campaign" aimed as helping poor people groups. >> reporter: according to historians reverend martin luther king was very concerned that the economic gap between races could derail his civil rights movement with poverty and income disparities being the ultimate segregator. >> in 1968 he pivoted all of his attention on what was called the poor people's campaign. he was killed before his first march. >> repor
. presidents present and past, gather at the mall in washington. >> nidal hasan is a coward and unrepentant murderer. >> a convicted felon receives a death sentence. >>> u.n.'s leader asks for more time for inspections and diplomas. diplomacy. the 50s anniversary of the march on washington brought out some of the biggest names in politics and the civil righting movement. tengz of thousands gathered at the lincoln memorial, congressman john lewis, the only living person who spoke 50 years ago was there. keynote speaker president obama. >> march 50 years ago was not merely how many blacks could join the ranks of millionaires, it was whether this country would admit all people who were willing to work hard regardless of race into the ranks of a middle class life. >> mike viquera joins us. there was forrest whittaker, oprah winfrey was there, i'm curious who the crowd responded to most. >> you know tony it was an extraordinary day, it was renewal, celebration and commemoration. a lot of people who were talented public speakers really moved the crowd. and i gt to mention there was music that was
're on the national mall, marking 50 years since the historic march on washington. a ground-breaking court ruling says you can be in trouble for sending a text to someone who is driving. >> we begin this morning with a look at today's "eye opener," your world in 90 seconds. >> if the order comes, you're ready to go, like that? >> we're ready to go like that. >> washington weighs the consequences for syria. >> u.s.-led military strike against syria could be launched as early as tomorrow. >> this is turning into a regional conflict and we need to reverse it. now is an opportunity to do so. >> the dow had its worst day since june. as possible military strikes hangs over wall street. >> bragging about taking control over media websites including twitter and "the new york times." >> fire continues to spread near yosemite. now growing 280 square miles, destroying more than 100 buildings. >> final moments of freedom for the surviving boston marathon bombing suspect. >> on this day in 1963, martin luther king jr. delivered h famous i have a dream speech. >> president obama among those who will speak at a cere
, the reverend martin luther king, jr. delivered his famous i have a dream speech. washington will be honoring that speech with one of his own. thousands are expected to attend the event which started with a march through washington at 9:00 this morning. and the anniversary will be marked by bells which will be bringing around the world at 3:00 eastern time. our special coverage from the lincoln memorial begins at 2:00 eastern time, so please stay with us. >>> the united states is now sending a special envoy to north korea. in april a north careen court sentenced kenneth bay to 15 years of hard labor on charges of subversion. as always more news right after the break on al jazeera. ♪ this is the 900-page document we call obamacare. it could change costs, coverage, and pretty much all of healthcare in america. my show sorts this all out. in fact, my staff has read the entire thing. which is probably more than what most members of congress can claim. we'll separate politics from policy, and just prescribe the facts. what happens when social media uncovers unheard and fascinating news stories?
. >>> welcome back live to the lincoln memorial here as we mark the 50th anniversary of the march on washington with the closing ceremonies at this hour. on the stage, you'll see the host for today's event, journalist soledad o'brien and actor and author hill harper welcoming the crowd that has gathered here. and the crowd gathering along the reflecting pool. trying to get the crowd energized as the speakers begin to work towards the podium. speaking to the folks who were here in 1963, encouraging them to stand up and be represented in the crowd that has gathered 50 years later. the invocation happening in just a few minutes here. the first speaker, ambassador andrew young, who if you saw barbara a barbara's story with him, has an incredible story to tell. we'll hear from others as well. back to you. >> now let's get the latest developments in syria. the u.n. special envoy to syria says evidence suggests some kind of chemical substance was used in an attack last week. the comments came as a team of u.n. inspectors continue, to look for evidence syrian troops used chemical weapons. the white hou
in the united states. >> also, celebrating the beginning of a dream: live in washington, dc, making a milestone in the fight for civi >> covering novato,," sunnyvale and all bay area this is abc7 news. >> today is the 50th anniversary of a watershed moment in our in addition's history. in 1963 a march and a speech by dr. martin luther king jr. led to a quantum leap in civil rights. we are joined from the lincoln memorial in washington, dc, with dead's commemoration. >> today is about the past and the fight. thousands will come here to honor the freedom marchers who stood at the very spot 50 years ago today and will hear a message of the future and hope from the nation's first black president, president obama. >> 50 years ago today, they poured into washington, by the bus loads, a march of tens of thousands, black and white, to the monument of the president would freed the slaves. their signs and voices demanding racial equality. today a celebration of progress at the lincoln memorial and a call to action on new challenges, three american presidents: jimmy carter, bill clinton and barack obama s
on that belief. >> and joining me now is washington post columnist eugene robins robinson, clip matthews, and nathan conley. we also have standing by ron allen at the lincoln memorial. chris and eugene, we're waiting to alert our audience of the founder and president of the children's defense fund. she served as council for mlk's poor people campaign. she will be speaking shortly. the anticipation is growing to the president's remarks. >> yes, i think we've heard a lot of great oratory today, but the concrete news story for tomorrow morning's papers and tonight on the nightly news is going to have to come from the president. he is really being set up here, if you will, to deliver something concrete. now, i really think it's important that he do that on the issue of jobs because this was, of course, a commemoration today and has been of the campaign for jobs back 50 years ago that martin luther king led. jobs. i think that's how the standard is going to be set for his speech tonight. will he promise something really, really big that the republicans will have a hard time saying no to? or w
. i'm chris matthews in washington. the content of his character. remember that great line in martin luther king's speech? remember how he offered the hope that his four little children as he put it would some day be judged not by the color of their skin but by the content of their character? have we reached that day? have we? is that how people of color are judged today? is that how the president of the united states has been judged? by the content of his character? i wish. you may wish. he must wish. barack obama the man has led a remarkable life. he excelled in school. he climbed to the ivy league and made editor of the harvard law review in a blind test that has nothing to do with affirmative action. nothing. he has led an unblemished life, has been a solid faithful husband, a loving caring father to his daughters. his political flaw is that he spends too many evenings with his family and not enough time caging and winning over the follow politicians. he's too much the stay at home husband. and what has been the judgment of the right wing? have they said a single word of good abo
into the national mall here in washington, d.c. the day was hot, they marched through the nation's capital. they were standing in the sun mopping sweat from their brows when the moment arrived, when dr. martin luther king jr. shared his dream. >> i have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character. i have a dream today. >>> it became clear that day with it wasn't clear already that change was coming. this was the scene at the national mall on that day, august 28th, 1963. and this was the scene at the mall today. on the 50th anniversary of the march on washington. 50 years since dr. king took the podium with a vision of abraham lincoln looking on from the memorial perch. the king family rang a bell at the mall in unison with bells at more than 300 sites across the country from alabama to alaska at the very hour that dr. king implored the nation to led freedom ring. in washington they say it's a great drizly late summer day, but no way it would stop this crowd from coming out.
in washington, today marks the 50th anniversary of the march on washington, a major celebration is planned bringing together former presidents, politicians and dozens of stars but the event is more than just a tribute to the progress made by the civil rights movement, it's a reminder of the work that remains. cnn's don lemon has much more on this. >> reporter: 50 years ago today about a quarter million people marched on the national wall on wash twush demand change. dr. martin luther king jr. sharing his dream for america from the steps of the lincoln memorial. his indelible words a watershed moment in the civil rights movement. today thousand also gather to commemorate the famous words that forever changed our country. >> 50 years ago there was so much fear, people were afraid to be afraid. the fear is gone. our country is better and we are a better people. we still have a distance to go. >> reporter: that distance front and center today as the nation's first black president will add his vision as the marquee speaker at the anniversary celebration. president obama acknowledges that, while
on washington and of course delivered the i have a dream speech. take a look at the front page of "the new york times." 1963. the language itself is just dramatic. you see the picture. it's funny to see on the left, president kennedy signed the bill to a vert a rail strike. kin did i was shot to death a few months later. the march helped pave the way for the civil rights act of 1964 and the voting rights act of 1965. it wasn't until the year 2,000 that all 50 states officially observed martin luther king dare. there are a number of events planned today. just before 3:00 p.m. president obama will speak at the lincoln memorial. preceding him will be speeches by former presidents jimmy carter and bill clinton. and in exclusive video provided to "meet the press," president bill clinton took the opportunity to reflect on the march and martin luther king's legacy. >> on august 28th, 1963, i was 17 years old. i knew that martin luther king was scheduled to give the speech so i made sure i was home. it was during summer vacation between my junior and senior years in high school. so i was home sitting i
someone i look to, someone who knows this city well. we're talking about the march on washington and yet in today's world washington has become synonymous with a place of dysfunction, of anger, of partisanship, of rancor. i guess to what degree can we rekindle that possibility. how can this society recode what washington means sway place of failure. >> well i don't want to suggest it's a symetrick problem. there was a decision 4 1/2 years ago to prevents this presidency of president obama from taking effect. they want to remoist from the history books as much as they could even though he had been elected legitimately with a larger majority than ronald reagan had back in 1980. they wanted to somehow deny him his presidency. that began with the meetings that were held the very night of the inaugural and carried through with the ridiculousness and thericiso donald trump on the birther argument. it's been augmented by talk of impeachment and nullification of the president's landmark bill on health. it's a continual effort to say no to hope. on the other side somewhat balancing it has been th
, following his speech at the lincoln memorial today, 50 years after the march on washington. >> no one can match king's brilliance but the same flame can light the heart of all who are willing to take a first step towards justice. i know that flame remains. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> supported by the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation. committed to building a more just, verdant and peaceful world. more information at macfound.org >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: there was a flurry of activity around the world today on what happens next in syria. at the united nations, britain submitted a resolution to the security council condemning syria for an alleged chemical attack, and authorizing the use of force in response. the u.n. envoy to syria, lakhdar brahimi, warned any military action mu
shared by washington. very limited objective, one might say. definitely not regime change. that has been stressed by london and washington. what they want is to send a clear message to bashar al-assad that he cannot use chemical weapons again. they are not looking for regime change. it is actually not in their interest according to many analyses of western powers, for the regime to fall, because that may lead to a boy that could be filled by extreme islamist groups. in that way, western countries are someone on the same page as moscow. they have interest in the continuity and stability of the party, even if bashar al-assad himself would be toppled. their objective right now is to restore the credibility of western countries on the international scene and send a strong message to bashar al- assad, you cannot use chemical weapons. >> thank you very much. moving on to another wave of bombings in iraq. at least 50 have been killed and dozens injured. this is been predominantly shiite areas around baghdad. the car bombings is the latest in a relentless wave of killings since april making for
of the history that there was such a sense that there was going to be violence here in washington on that day, and people who came were taking a risk. often times they were young people whose parents feared for their safety and coming to washington that day. we've heard reference to the fact that troops were surrounding the city. you may not remember, but it was held on a wednesday to ensure that people would not come and remain over any weekend, and buses came in early that morning at dawn, and the buses were lined up near to the national mall, and positioned so they could quickly exit, and all the liquor stores in town were closed, you know. the security was just incredible. the congress was gone. those people who came and who made the effort really stood out and sent a message to the nation. >> to the king, the family who have sacrificed and inspired so much, as president clinton, president carter, vice-president biden, jill, fellow americans, five decades ago today americans came to this honored place to lay claim to a promise made at our founding. we hold these truths to be self-evident.
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 196 (some duplicates have been removed)